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Archive for November, 2009

Modify Disk layout in Windows using powershell – updated version

At work one of my colleagues is fond of the phrase: Assume – makes and ass of you and me

Now this has, again, become very appropriate for me to use:

In my first post of the disk layout script, found here, I wrote with assumption and confidence: β€œbut should also work on Windows Server 2003, if it does not then I have to redo the Altiris job”…

So I have redone the Altiris job powershell script:

#first we find and initialize physical disks with no partitions
$drives = gwmi Win32_diskdrive
$scriptdisk = $Null
$script = $Null
$OSversion = (((Get-WmiObject Win32_operatingsystem).version).ToString()).Split('.')[0]

foreach ($disk in $drives){
if ($disk.Partitions -eq "0"){
    $drivenumber = $disk.DeviceID -replace '[\\\\\.\\physicaldrive]',''
    
    If ($OSversion -eq "5"){
$script = @"
select disk $drivenumber
online noerr
create partition primary noerr
"@
    }
    ElseIf ($OSversion -eq "6"){
$script = @"
select disk $drivenumber
online disk noerr
attributes disk clear readonly noerr
create partition primary noerr
format quick
"@
}
    }
    $drivenumber = $Null
    $scriptdisk += $script + "`n"
    }
$scriptdisk | diskpart

#then we will move the CDRom drive to x:
(gwmi Win32_cdromdrive).drive | %{$a = mountvol $_ /l;mountvol $_ /d;$a = $a.Trim();mountvol x: $a}

#then we will assign letters and labels to physical drives
# thanks to powershell.com for this bit
#(http://powershell.com/cs/blogs/tips/archive/2009/01/15/enumerating-drive-letters.aspx)
$volumes = gwmi Win32_volume | where {$_.BootVolume -ne $True -and $_.SystemVolume -ne $True}
$letters = 68..89 | ForEach-Object { ([char]$_)+":" }
$freeletters = $letters | Where-Object { 
  (New-Object System.IO.DriveInfo($_)).DriveType -eq 'NoRootDirectory'
}
foreach ($volume in $volumes){
    if ($volume.DriveLetter -eq $Null){
        If ($OSVersion -eq "5"){
          mountvol $freeletters[0] $volume.DeviceID
          format $freeletters[0] /FS:NTFS /q /y
        }
        Else {
            mountvol $freeletters[0] $volume.DeviceID    
        }    
    }
$freeletters = $letters | Where-Object { 
    (New-Object System.IO.DriveInfo($_)).DriveType -eq 'NoRootDirectory'
}
} 

As it turns out, diskpart v5.2 does not support either the online disk command nor the format quick command, which is why I have had to add OS filtering (got to love the one-liner πŸ™‚ and the format command.

I have also had to remove the $_.DriveType -eq "3", as an unformated primary partition under Windows Server 2003 R2 does not have a drivetype defined. But in order to salvage some honor, I’ll call that optimization, as it is actually not required, because that part of the script only assigns drive letters to volumes without one, and both the floppy and CDRom have one already.

/theadminguy

Export DHCP leases to html using powershell – update

There was a minor quirk in the original script, as lease dates where being mixed with hostnames in the final output html. As it turns out it was all a matter of what date it was, when I created the script πŸ™‚

Line 21 in the original:

$l = $l -replace '[-]{1}\d{2}[/]\d{2}[/]\d{4}',''

matches dates in the following format: -xx/yy/zzzz but not -x/yy/zzzz or for that matter -xx/y/zzzz.

The correct –replace should have been:

$l = $l -replace '[-]{1}\d{1,2}[/]\d{1,2}[/]\d{4}',''

Thanks you for the comments, which was the final spark to get me to fix it in my production environment πŸ™‚

Modify disk layout in Windows using powershell

So I have been configuring the company Altiris server (I love that tool) with some new jobs.

One of the headaches of past times, for me anyway, has been the modification of the disk layout, e.g. cd-rom must have letter so, a random number of physical disks must be formatted etc.

This is the powershell solution that I ended up with:

#first we find and initialize physical disks with no partitions 
$drives = gwmi Win32_diskdrive
$scriptdisk = $Null
$script = $Null
foreach ($disk in $drives){
    if ($disk.Partitions -eq "0"){
        $drivenumber = $disk.DeviceID -replace '[\\\\\.\\physicaldrive]',''        
$script = @"
select disk $drivenumber
online disk noerr
attributes disk clear readonly noerr
create partition primary noerr
format quick
"@
}
$drivenumber = $Null
$scriptdisk += $script + "`n"
}
$scriptdisk | diskpart

#then we will move the CDRom drive to x:
(gwmi Win32_cdromdrive).drive | %{$a = mountvol $_ /l;mountvol $_ /d;$a = $a.Trim();mountvol x: $a}

#then we will assign letters and labels to physical drives
# thanks to powershell.com for this bit
#(http://powershell.com/cs/blogs/tips/archive/2009/01/15/enumerating-drive-letters.aspx)
$volumes = gwmi Win32_volume | where {$_.BootVolume -ne $True -and $_.SystemVolume -ne $True -and $_.DriveType -eq "3"}
$letters = 68..89 | ForEach-Object { ([char]$_)+":" }
$freeletters = $letters | Where-Object { 
  (New-Object System.IO.DriveInfo($_)).DriveType -eq 'NoRootDirectory'
}
foreach ($volume in $volumes){
    if ($volume.DriveLetter -eq $Null){
        mountvol $freeletters[0] $volume.DeviceID
    }
$freeletters = $letters | Where-Object { 
    (New-Object System.IO.DriveInfo($_)).DriveType -eq 'NoRootDirectory'
}
} 

The script has been tested in PSHv2 installed on Windows Server 2008 and in native Windows 2008 R2 PSH, but should also work on Windows Server 2003, if it does not then I have to redo the Altiris job πŸ™‚ – Update 14-11-2009: As it turns out the above will not work under Windows server 2003 – the updated version can be found here

The script first gets all the physical disks which have no partitions. Then it creates a script for use with diskpart. Once all physical disks are formatted, driveletters are assigned. First we move the cd-rom drive to x: then we loop through all volumes which are not BootVolume (e.g. c:\) or SystemVolume (W2k8 R2 reserved system partition)

Throw some comments or input to improve. I am particularly interested in a way to do this using .NET, so I do not have to use diskpart.

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